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No Smoking Signs

View our full range of Smoking Signs and buy a No Smoking Sign and E-Cigarettes signage to keep your building compliant with the latest UK government legislation. 

Employers should have a clear policy against smoking on the job. Cigarette control policies should prioritise the requirements of nonsmokers who do not desire to breathe tobacco smoke. Employers should communicate with their workers and representatives, such as unions in large workplaces, to determine the most acceptable smoking policy for their workplace. This should include outdoor areas where smoking is permitted.

Is it a legal requirement to display a No Smoking Sign?

Since 1st July 2007, smoking has been illegal in England at work under a new Government law passed as part of the health act 2006.

In July 2007, the ban on smoking in enclosed public places and the workplace took effect across the United Kingdom, following the 2006 health act. Smoke-free legislation was introduced in England in 2007, banning smoking in almost all enclosed workplaces and public spaces, following similar bans in Scotland and Wales. In England, the legislation came through the Health Act 2006, effectively banning smoking in all enclosed workplaces and public spaces, with a few limited exceptions. Under the Health Act 2006, bans extended to enclosed spaces, public transport, and even smoking inside business vehicles.

Public health laws in the United Kingdom say enclosed, or substantially enclosed workplaces and public places must not allow smoking. Workplaces should take reasonable steps to ensure all their employees, customers, members, and visitors are aware that smoking is prohibited on both premises and in company vehicles. Employers may also specify how far from the premises employees must stand before smoking is allowed.

In private businesses, deciding whether smoking is allowed in outdoor areas that are partially enclosed would be up to the employer. Just as employers are not required by law to offer smoke breaks, they are also not required to provide designated smoking areas to employees. While employers are not legally obligated to offer smoke breaks nor pay for breaks taken, many employers are sympathetic and permit their employees to have short smoke breaks during their workday.

For many employers, the law may appear somewhat vague about the length and frequency of smoking breaks employees are entitled to. The regulations are designed to safeguard employees' health. It is a criminal offence for employers to allow employees to smoke in the workplace.

The employer must communicate to employees that any new regulations violation would lead to discipline. In the short-term, building owners should insist smokers take their breaks outside, leaving the employee lounge as the place for all employees to rest in a smoke-free environment. Employers also need to establish clear, easily-accessible policies about smoke-free policies, which could help employees address the problem of smoking at work.

Companies can significantly benefit from having smoke-free policies because it allows you to assure employees that their health and well-being are being taken care of while they are at work. Here, employers must comply with health and safety regulations and reduce the amount of secondhand smoke in the workplace. As employers are legally responsible for their employee's health and safety, it is up to them to ensure smoke-free policies are followed within the working environment.

It has been stated that employers are legally responsible for stopping people from smoking in indoor workspaces and work vehicles. No Smoking signs are covered under the same stringent laws that govern all health and safety signs at the workplace. There are strict rules about what Employers should display types of smoke-free signs in a workplace.

Employees should be responsible for keeping their smoking areas clean because severe health and safety risks can result from neglect. Companies should implement a smoking-safety policy allowing employees to use designated smoking areas. If you are providing your employees with smoking facilities, they must follow related legislation.

In premises permitted exemptions from smoke-free legislation, the Health and Safety Legislation will continue to require employers to reduce the risk to their employees' health and safety of secondhand smoking to the lowest possible level and encourage employers to implement workplace smoking policies that prioritize non-smokers' wishes to avoid being exposed to secondhand smoking. Further details about the requirements in this legislation and what this means for businesses, employers, employees and the general public can be found at the Smoke-Free England website. From 1st July 2007, all public places and workplaces became smoke-free in England, except for a limited number of exceptions, as per the Smoke-free (Premises and Control) Regulations 2006.

Employers must consult their employees and union representatives about an appropriate smoking policy for their specific workplace. Prohibition would not just be for employees but their visitors and customers when in the workplace.

The actual costs will depend on many variables, such as the type of staff employed and the ease with which employers can replace staff, whether or not smoking breaks are allowed, how many staff members smoke cigarettes (heavy smokers vs light smokers) and physical characteristics of the work environment. From the estimates presented below, it is evident that employees' smoking does have high costs for employers. Furthermore, studies point out negative images of employees gathering together outside of work stations for smoking, as well as adverse effects for non-constant smokers, in terms of perceived unfairness in additional breaks and the prevalence of cigarette smoking among non-smokers. These costs are specific to every work situation and extremely difficult to generalise.

Smoking signs, such as a no smoking sticker for public areas like a restaurant or office, contain a prohibition circle with a lit cigarette image with white text on a red background.  A No Smoking Sign serves as a notice sign to say that smoking is strictly prohibited in a certain area. Smoking is often allowed in areas that do not display a no smoking sign, restaurants and hotels display no smoking signs as well as many other hospitality sectors. 

All businesses have a legal responsibility to provide effective smoking area signs on their premises, with fines of up to £2500 for businesses that fail to do so. It is a legal duty to display at least one smoking sign within a smoke-free premises and vehicles but there will be discretion for their design and location. 

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